Bad repaint - Why detail & protect your original paint

Veloc

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Veloc

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Not a detailing record here. This is a special post that aims to educate people about the horror of having your car resprayed and why you should protect your original paint the best you can. Sadly, this story happened to my own car.

This car had its boot sent for repainting just last year. It looked great upon completion except for the surface finishing that is not so clear and sharp - typical of many freshly repainted surface. This boot was recently given a detail with the aim of giving it a mirror finish, but disappointingly... Let the pictures talk.


Look at the lack of clarity and definition. This is before detail.



On some parts, the paint was successfully transformed from this...



To this



But take a look at these other parts...

A 50/50 shot of before and after. 2 passes of M105 on Lake country purple foamed wool and one pass of M205 on Lake country polishing pad. The gloss and clarity is slightly restored. But look at the sanding marks. Those fine line scratches.



From a distance.



Close up.



Closer



On other parts, look at the surface unevenness.



A close up.



Regardless of how many times the paint is cut, it seems like there is no way to get the paint even and to remove those sanding marks. The reason for this is that the clear coat is sprayed over the colour coat before the sanding marks are completely removed and the paint is leveled. Locking all defects under the clear coat.

This is what most repainted surface will look like. Commercially driven, workers are not well trained, time and cost savings are prioritised. This is not the case for all paint shops as some are really good. But one must go to a shop that one really knows and trusts. Paying a little higher for a good job is often better.

The best is still to protect and maintain one's original paint for as long as possible. One way is to get your car detailed and coated for long lasting protection. Pinnacle Reflections offers a range of detailing and coating services.

As for this paint shop who belongs to a friend, this is not my first car that has been ruined. A previous car that was sent had the paint cracked and peeling after 6 months. I use to recommend this shop to other friends as I use to trust what they do. From now on, don't expect any recommendation from me.
 

KrisMas

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KrisMas

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Doesn't look like sanding marks to me....looks more like brush marks!!! I didn't know they still use brushes in bodyshops!!! THAT IS HORRIBLE WORKS!!!

I know this guy who is ANAL about his car's paintwork. When he got into an accident and had to repaint the whole front portion of his car, he made sure that his painter tell him when they finish each and every layer of the painting process, from the filler until the final clear coat. He was there every time they finish a layer, armed with sanding blocks and sanding papers, to make sure the paint is FLAT before the next layer was shot. Came out the bodyshop with 'Rolls-Royce-quality' paintwork....but the car was in the bodyshop FOR RE-PAINTING ONLY for ONE WHOLE MONTH though....hahahah.....
 

Veloc

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Veloc

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I thought sanding marks because last time KC pointed out to me. That time, I didn't cared much because the paint was not clear and the marks are not apparent. But once I detail it everything shows!
Brush marks you say??? What do they use it for? I never expected that!!!!
 
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Lepakboy

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Lepakboy

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I'm no expert but it would seem that the spray wasn't uniformed. It is quite clear that it is the base coat that's faulty so perhaps bad prep at the primer stage or a bad air compressor during the base coat. Either way, you'll be looking to sand this down to Primer and start all over again.

Whilst I do agree that the factory paint job is one of the best, I still believe that top painters can do better. Let's not forget that most of the exotic cars of old, including the some brand new ones are painted by hand, so mechanized doesn't mean better.

From what I've read based from the Iwata and Devilbiss manuals, one of the best finishes you can get is if you.

Prime, Sand with 600 grit, Two Coats of Base (Sand with 800 after the second coat has cured, but before it loses its ability to catch the clear, finally 2 coats of Clearcoat) Only after that has been fully cured do you sand it down with 1,500, 2,000, and 3,000 , and polish to perfection. (I would love to paint all this myself, but with 2k paint being so toxic I doubt I'll be doing it in the near future).

-Don't quote me on the steps above, but its been well documented on most auto paint sites.
 

KrisMas

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KrisMas

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Brush marks you say??? What do they use it for? I never expected that!!!!
I was joking about the brush marks. But, seriously, it looks to me they didn't properly level the putty/filler before they shoot the primer...looks like they just use the spreader then straight away shoot primer....
 

Veloc

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Veloc

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I'm no expert but it would seem that the spray wasn't uniformed. It is quite clear that it is the base coat that's faulty so perhaps bad prep at the primer stage or a bad air compressor during the base coat. Either way, you'll be looking to sand this down to Primer and start all over again.

Whilst I do agree that the factory paint job is one of the best, I still believe that top painters can do better. Let's not forget that most of the exotic cars of old, including the some brand new ones are painted by hand, so mechanized doesn't mean better.

From what I've read based from the Iwata and Devilbiss manuals, one of the best finishes you can get is if you.

Prime, Sand with 600 grit, Two Coats of Base (Sand with 800 after the second coat has cured, but before it loses its ability to catch the clear, finally 2 coats of Clearcoat) Only after that has been fully cured do you sand it down with 1,500, 2,000, and 3,000 , and polish to perfection. (I would love to paint all this myself, but with 2k paint being so toxic I doubt I'll be doing it in the near future).

-Don't quote me on the steps above, but its been well documented on most auto paint sites.
Yeah about the good quality painters... That's why I said this doesn't apply too all paint shops. One must go to a shop that one knows and really trust. I myself hope to find one in my area (Kota Kinabalu, Sabah). Then again, a good quality paint job will cost a bomb. Best to protect the factory paint.

And Wow! Thanks for so much info on the auto painting that's very enlightening...
 

KrisMas

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KrisMas

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Prime, Sand with 600 grit, Two Coats of Base (Sand with 800 after the second coat has cured, but before it loses its ability to catch the clear, finally 2 coats of Clearcoat) Only after that has been fully cured do you sand it down with 1,500, 2,000, and 3,000 , and polish to perfection. (I would love to paint all this myself, but with 2k paint being so toxic I doubt I'll be doing it in the near future).

-Don't quote me on the steps above, but its been well documented on most auto paint sites.
I think that's how my friend did it. Only difference was I think he used sanding blocks instead of sand paper for the primer.....